#CityofMargins by @wmboyle4

In City of Margins, the lives of several lost souls intersect in Southern Brooklyn in the early 1990s. There’s Donnie Parascandolo, a disgraced ex-cop with blood on his hands; Ava Bifulco, a widow whose daily work grind is her whole life; Nick, Ava’s son, a grubby high school teacher who dreams of a shortcut to success; Mikey Baldini, a college dropout who’s returned to the old neighbourhood, purposeless and drifting; Donna Rotante, Donnie’s ex-wife, still reeling from the suicide of their teenage son; Mikey’s mother, Rosemarie, also a widow, who hopes Mikey won’t fall into the trap of strong arm work; and Antonina Divino, a high school girl with designs on breaking free from Brooklyn. Uniting them are the dead: Mikey’s old man, killed over a gambling debt, and Donnie and Donna’s poor son, Gabe.

These characters cross paths in unexpected ways, guided by coincidence and the pull of blood. There are new things to be found in the rubble of their lives, too. The promise of something different beyond the barriers that have been set out for them. This is a story of revenge and retribution, of facing down the ghosts of the past, of untold desires, of yearning and forgiveness and synchronicity, of the great distance of lives lived in dangerous proximity to each other. City of Margins is a Technicolor noir melodrama pieced together in broken glass.

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‘I was with Suzy when it happened’.

DONNIE PARASCANDOLO

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(@OldcastleBooks, 24 September 2020, 320 pages, ebook, #ARC from the publisher via #NetGalley and voluntarily reviewed, #BlogTour 24 September via @RandomTTours)

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GET A COPY

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I really enjoyed this book. It reminds me a lot of the Tale of the City books. I enjoyed the structure of the book, how each chapter is narrated by a different character, bouncing between different POV’s and gradually revealing the threads that join these lives together. Each character has their own story and it’s slowly revealed how intertwined everyone’s lives, secrets and mistakes are. The characters are all very different and so well-written they felt real. The book is quite dark and intense at times but there are some very funny moments to ease some of the grimness.

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